Number TEN Architectural Group's blog provides the latest news from the leading Canadian architect firm.

Brent B blog 1 
By Brent Bellamy, Creative Director and Architect
Republished with permission courtesy of the Winnipeg Free Press.

The recent release of Canada’s 2016 census was like catnip for us statistics nerds. Across the country, we slouched at our computers into the early hours, poring over everything from aggregate dissemination areas to census agglomerations.
Sprawling growth encroaches on farmland and affecting resources. Number TEN focuses on sustainable architecture for this reason. Image: (Brent Bellamy) The capital region’s sprawling growth is encroaching on important farmland and affecting other natural resources.

Brent B blog 1 
By Brent Bellamy, Creative Director and Architect
Republished with permission courtesy of the Winnipeg Free Press.

Union Bank Tower has quietly watched over Winnipeg from the bend in Main Street for 113 years. Symbolic of a more optimistic time, its full significance has been lost in our civic memory. If this elegant building stood in one of Canada’s more confident cities, it might adorn postcards and tourist brochures. In Winnipeg, a small bronze plaque on its facade timidly boasts, "The city’s first skyscraper." A deeper investigation, however, reveals it likely deserves to be celebrated with the much loftier title of "Canada’s first skyscraper."
Number TEN architects in Winnipeg need only look downtown for inspiration. Image: (Brent Bellamy) Winnipeg’s Union Bank Tower can rightfully claim to be Canada’s first skyscraper.

Brent B blog 1 
By Brent Bellamy, Creative Director and Architect
Republished with permission courtesy of the Winnipeg Free Press.

Makes no sense to dismiss rail relocation, riverwalk protection without knowing costs, benefits
There is always a reason not to be bold. There are always other priorities. It is always easier to continue doing what you know.

What has made most of the world’s great cities great is the ability to embrace a vision for the future and demonstrate the courage to make choices that challenge the status quo.
Municipal architect projects are executable with Number TEN's experts.Image: Ken Gigliotti / Winnipeg Free Press Files

Brent B blog 1 
By Brent Bellamy, Creative Director and Architect
Republished with permission courtesy of the Winnipeg Free Press.

City's thirst for growth fees ignores their power as a planning tool
For the last 50 years, Winnipeg’s built-up geographic area has been increasing at a rate of more than twice the city’s population growth. There are 20 per cent fewer people living in River Heights today than in 1970. In Wolseley, the population is down 36 per cent, St. Boniface 23 per cent and even busy Osborne Village has seen a population decline of 11 per cent during that time.
Population density factors into the work that Number TEN's architects do on a community-by-community basis.Image: (Supplied / Winnipeg Free Press) An infill project in River Heights: the city should use a carrot-and-stick approach with growth fees to discourage sprawl and encourage projects that improve population density, Brent Bellamy writes.

Brent B blog 1 
By Brent Bellamy, Creative Director and Architect
Republished with permission courtesy of the Winnipeg Free Press.

Developing alleys could breathe new life into the city
The back lane was a perfect spot to play street hockey when we were kids. The narrow alley was enclosed and protected, houses were close-set, allowing our parents to maintain a watchful eye. The occasional slow-moving vehicle could be accommodated simply with an enthusiastic howl of ‘car!’
The Dark Knight makes his presence felt in Winnipeg, as do the architects at Number TEN.Image: (Supplied / Winnipeg Free Press) The silhouette of Batman adorns a downtown alleyway. Public art such as graffiti gives alleyways their unique, urban character.

Number TEN Blog

Number TEN Inspired! captures the knowledge, passion and ideas of our award winning architects, interior designers and supporting staff, as they navigate through the complexities of the modern design landscape. We are creative problem solvers, advocates for better ways of doing things, and observers of all that is interesting and noteworthy in our field. This blog is our effort to share our knowledge and ideas in a way that resonates with everyone. Whether you work in the industry as an architect, interior designer, building manager, property developer, or are just someone with an interest in creativity and new ways of doing things, this blog has something for you.